Raspberry Pi – Retro Gaming Set up – Step 2

Thanks to Amazon Prime and the Next Day Delivery – everything arrived right on time for me to spend the most of yesterday setting up the Raspberry Pi and playing games that were just a distant memeory.  To be fair though the setting up was a minor aspect of the day.  It took about 10 mins to open the package, build the Raspberry Pi and have it sitting ready for it’s memory card to tell it what to do!  It is really that *easy.*

*easy* – truthfully there are a few stumbling blocks but I will post up a couple of videos at the end of this post that covers the tricky bits very well.

Raspberry Pi - What you will need for a RetroPie Setup
Raspberry Pi – What you will need for a RetroPie Setup
Samsung Evo Micro SD Cards
Samsung Evo Micro SD Cards

That’s what you will need :

  1. Raspberry Pi 3 Model 3
  2. Raspberry Pi Power Adapeter
  3. HDMI Cable
  4. 64Gb Micro SD Card (for retropie image)
  5. 128GB Micro SD Card (for retropie image 2)
  6. Raspberry Pi Heat Sink Set
  7. Official Raspberry Pi Case

I bought a couple of 64GB cards as they were a great price – it means you can effectively just plug and play different setups without having to rewrite cards all the time – and on seeing some of the great setups that get released I already need a couple more 128GB cards – unfortunately they are still pretty pricey.

Setting up the Raspberry Pi honestly could not be more easy :

1.  Prepare the case – I opted for an official Raspberry Pi Case in White :

Raspberry Pi Offical Case - White
Raspberry Pi Offical Case – White
Raspberry Pi Offical Case - White
Raspberry Pi Offical Case – White

2.  From here you have two options – install heat sinks or don’t.  I chose to do so – can’t hurt to keep the machine a little cooler and they only cost a few quid.

Raspberry Pi - Install Heat Sinks (Optional)
Raspberry Pi – Install Heat Sinks (Optional)
Raspberry Pi - Install Heat Sinks (Optional)
Raspberry Pi – Install Heat Sinks (Optional)

(You can of course opt for not installing heatsinks – the installation of the case is unaffected by either option)

Raspberry Pi - Install without Heat Sinks
Raspberry Pi – Install without Heat Sinks

3.  This case does not require the board to be screwed in – but from the images you can see this is an option.  Just close it up and thats you ready to get some power.  This case also has the added advantage of a removable lid which gives instant and easy access to the board should you require it :

Raspberry Pi - Official Case - White
Raspberry Pi – Official Case – White
Raspberry Pi - Official Case - White
Raspberry Pi – Official Case – White
IMG_1403Raspberry Pi - Official Case - White - Removable lid allows access to the board
IMG_1403Raspberry Pi – Official Case – White – Removable lid allows access to the board

4. Pop in your RetroPie Image on your Micro SD Card (I opted for this one initially : http://www.arcadepunks.com/attract-mode-full-download-128gb-image-unified-layout/)

(If you need help on setting up a memory stick to be used in your RetroPie Setup check out this page – it covers everything on both PC and Mac : https://howchoo.com/g/n2qyzdk5zdm/build-your-own-raspberry-pi-retro-gaming-rig)

5. Plug in your HDMI lead, connect it to you TV.

6. Plug in your power adapter to the Raspberry Pi and your Power Source.

7.  Let it boot up and enjoy!

RetroPie
RetroPie

*easy* The awkward thing then I mentioned :

Set-up controllers : I initially opted for a PS4 Dual Shock (wired) – it worked OK, but was a little tempremental.  I then tried a wired xBox / Windows controller and it worked straight out of the box.

I did find these two videos which are very good for setting up the controller initially for ‘Attract Mode’ – the second video for ‘Retroarch.’

 

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