Scotland’s North Coast 500 GPX Route File – NC500 GPX

North Coast 500 : Scotland : NC500

I have now uploaded my galleries and Ride Report of my 2016 trip around the Scotland’s North Coast 500 (NC500).  You can find them all here :

http://tbni.blog/2017/12/09/scotlands-north-coast-500-nc500-ride-report/

One thing I did notice (for example in comparison to the Irish Wild Atlantic Way) was the lack of signage.  Unless you knew you were actually on the NC500 you probably wouldn’t know you were on it.

The GPX file is available from the official North Coast 500 site, along with a printable map however my Sat Nav (a Tom Tom Rider V) found it far too complex, there are thousands of way points on it, and the sat nav just just refused to load it.  The printable map is nice, but let’s be honest an A4 map covering 500 miles isn’t an ideal solution either.

Thankfully there is a good solution.  I found this GPX, I have no idea where, or who made it but is sat nav friendly and guides you perfectly around the route.

Enjoy

http://www.tbni.blog/downloads/North-Coast-500.gpx

(If you have any trouble downloading the file just Contact Me and I will email it to you.

North Coast 500 : Scotland : NC500
North Coast 500 : Scotland : NC500

#WAWIn1Week – Wild Atlantic Way In 1 Week – The Gear…

WAWIn1Week #WAWIn1Week Logo

So having just recently completed my trip of the West Coast of Ireland in 1 Week, along the longest Coastal Route in the World – The Wild Atlantic Way, taking in over 2,600km it is now time for me to put this trip into some sort of words, and more importantly share my photographs of this stunning area with the rest of world, and hopefully inspire a few more of you to take on this route.

The route itself is no secret, it is brilliantly signposted from start to finish and is easily completed without a sat nav, map of even the slightest clue about the geography of Ireland.  There are numerous towns and villages that you will pass through and the options from accommodation range from a bit of wild camping to official campsites, or gorgeous little family run B&Bs right through to Hotel Resorts and Spas.  Brilliant.  Initially I had planned on completing this trip with my only accommodation being at the side of the road where I stopped.  Just prior to my trip I decided on changing this due to the predicted weather, and the constant rain the Met Office told me I would be facing.  It turns out on this trip over the one week timescale the change to B&B style accommodation was a good one!

This first post though will cover the gear that I used on my trip, it will touch on my motorcycle, and the gear I used for the daily ride and how it held up with the weather of an Irish ‘Summer.’  Summer in this case needs the ‘ ‘ marks, as at the time of typing I think we are somewhere close to Day 60 of consecutive rain falling somewhere in the country (its a small country) and having just passed the coldest, wettest July since 2003.  On saying that as you will see over the up and coming #WAWIn1Week posts I was pretty lucky with the weather.  I did get a good, in fact severe soaking, twice – enough to test the gear to the absolute limits, but for most of the time I was only hitting passing showers, or trying to keep them in my mirrors!  With this route hugging the West Coast of Ireland and therefore the limits of the Atlantic Ocean it is subject to some pretty extreme weather conditions and one thing to remember if you are over and on the route what looks grim ahead may take a dramatic change around the next corner.  The weather is really that changeable and if you just look out over the ocean you will get a very good idea of what the jet stream is bringing across to you over the next couple of hours.

So here we go, the gear I used and how it coped with taking on the world’s longest dedicated coastal route, 2,600km and six days on the coast…

Read more#WAWIn1Week – Wild Atlantic Way In 1 Week – The Gear…

TomTom Rider V5 Hardwiring to BMW Can Bus Port (Aux Port / Sat Nav Port)

BMW F800GSA Sat Nav Port

BMW very kindly supply you with a Can Bus Supported Auxiliary Port on a range of their bikes that means you can easily wire your Sat Nav into the bike, meaning it will be powered from the battery of the motorcycle, however when you turn the bike off the Can Bus System then shuts down the power to the sat nav a short time later resulting no power going to the sat nav cradle and no battery drain.

Well that is the theory anyway, however some users have experienced battery drain and blame this set up, claiming that the Can Bus System isn’t compatible with their Sat Nav. That may be and BMW won’t say officially if that may be the case, stating only that their ‘Sat Nav’ port is for use solely with their Navigator System, and why not if you want to be 100% sure that everything is going to work beautifully together then you need to hand over £700 for the privilege.

Read moreTomTom Rider V5 Hardwiring to BMW Can Bus Port (Aux Port / Sat Nav Port)

TomTom Rider V5 Unboxing Gallery :

Having recently purchased a TomTom Rider V5 as my sat nav solution for my motorbike I became very aware that whilst browsing for the product it was hard enough to find out exactly what came in the box. To level the playing field a little I have made the following Unboxing Gallery. And just to be sure, to be sure, that any perspective buyer is completely aware of what comes in the box the contents are as follows :

TomTom Rider (V5) Sat Nav
Ram Mounting Kit (Non locking) for Mounting on bars (includes rubber to protect bars)
EU & UK Plug Options (For Wall Charging)
TomTom Rider Charging Dock & Mount (For on bike charging)
TomTom Rider Mounting Base Plate (&mounting screws, washers and bolts)
TomTom Wall Charger
TomTom Rider Wairing Kit for Hard Wiring to the Battery (see my next posting for how to hardwire to the CanBus system on a BMW Motorcycle)
USB Lead (For Syncing, Map Updating and Charging)
Documenation

At this stage I have had no real use of the satnav but when I do I will update with any thoughts and a short review. As I have already stated I will be commencing some Motorcycle VLogging Soon, so I may well cover the sat nav on one such journey.

One point I feel I must raise at this stage is that with the supplied mounting kit the use of a locking kit (approx £55) is a must unless you are very disciplined in removing the sat nav each and every time you are getting off the bike. With the system supplied with the device it could be taken off your bike within 5 seconds with no trouble. It could easily be gone during a quick stop at the ATM or whilst paying for fuel. There are many other mounting systems available that will give a little more security for a quick stop but be prepared to take your kit with you for any stop that is going to be more than a few minutes or when the bike is out of eyeshot. These devices are so expensive and so appealing to scumbag thieves that you have to be aware they are vulnerable and should never be left unattended.

Enjoy your exploration!

TomTom Rider V5 UnBoxing Gallery :

Read moreTomTom Rider V5 Unboxing Gallery :